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As Oxford MediStress continues to add to the functionality of it’s Leukocyte Coping Capacity Stress test, we welcome Andrew Neville as our Medical Devices Engineer

International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics

December 20, 2013

This study assessed the effect of exposure of volunteers to a mild, brief, psychologically stressful event, on the functional ability of leukocytes to produce reactive oxygen species in vitro...

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This study assessed the effect of exposure of volunteers to a mild, brief, psychologically stressful event, on the functional ability of leukocytes to produce reactive oxygen species in vitro.

Volunteers operated a car electric window and adjusted it to 4 pre-determined positions. Between each operation the mechanism’s polarity was covertly altered (group B) or remained unaltered (group A). For each treatment group 10 different subjects provided capillary blood samples pre- and post-stressor.

Using the leukocyte coping capacity (LCC) test kit, the ability of leukocytes to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro was assessed. ROS release differed significantly at 10 min post-stressor between treatment groups, suggesting exposure to acute psychological stress leads to a reduced ability to respond to bacterial challenge.

SHELTON-RAYNER G, MIAN R, CHANDLER S, ROBERTSON D, MACDONALD DW (2011) Quantifying transient psychological stress using a novel technique: changes to PMA-induced leukocyte production of ROS in vitroInt J Occup Safety & Ergonomics (JOSE) 17 (1), 3-13.

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Cellular Immunology Journal

December 20, 2013

This study, comprising of two phases, suggests that the immune system follows a similar trend...

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This study, comprising of two phases, suggests that the immune system follows a similar trend. In phase 1: 15 healthy subjects provided capillary blood samples before and after completing three basic tasks using, in turn, two automotive touch screen interfaces (Interface 1 antecedent version, Interface 2—improved version).

Using the leukocyte coping capacity (LCC) test kit, the ability of leukocytes to produce reactive oxygen species in vitro was assessed. Significant differences in leukocyte activity were shown between treatment groups, where the greatest post-test decrease occurred after using Interface 1.

Phase 2: a randomly selected sub-group (n = 4) underwent weekly repeat testing using both interfaces. Significant differences in post-test leukocyte reactivity were exhibited between test weeks for each interface- the magnitude of response decreasing with successive exposure.

SHELTON-RAYNER G, CHANDLER S, ROBERTSON D, MIAN R & MACDONALD DW (2010) Leukocyte reactivity as an objective means of quantifying mental loading during ergonomic evaluation. Cellular Immunology 263, 22–30

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