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Keep up with the latest from us and across the industry.

OMS is hiring! Seeking new Sales & Marketing Executive

May 8, 2018

Oxford MediStress, an Oxford University healthcare spin-out, is recruiting a  SALES & MARKETING EXECUTIVE  to work alongside a Founder of a previous FTSE-250 Biotech company The ideal candidate will be a Graduate with a background in a Biological or Medical Science (Psychology included) & must have excellent communication skills, both verbal and written. You will b...

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Oxford MediStress, an Oxford University healthcare spin-out, is recruiting a

 SALES & MARKETING EXECUTIVE

 to work alongside a Founder of a previous FTSE-250 Biotech company

The ideal candidate will be a Graduate with a background in a Biological or Medical Science (Psychology included) & must have excellent communication skills, both verbal and written. You will be an entrepreneurial, astute, and organised self-starter with the ability to develop and adapt this sales position as the company grows. Some experience in sales & marketing would be ideal.

To apply, send your CV & a detailed cover letter to:

admin@oxford-medistress.com

 Application deadline: 17:00 BST on 21st May 2018 

OMS is an Equal Opportunities Employer

Oxford MediStress CEO appears on Sky’s Chrissy B show

May 18, 2016

Dr David Sarphie recently appeared on Sky’s “Chrissy B Show”, a popular program devoted to health and wellness subjects. On the show Dr Sarphie discussed his background and described the benefits of Oxford MediStress’s CopingCapacity™ test...

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Oxford MediStress Ltd, a University of Oxford spin-out company commercializing a patented blood test for the rapid, direct, quantitative measurement of stress, announced that its CEO was recently interviewed on a popular health and wellness TV show.

Dr David Sarphie recently appeared on Sky’s “Chrissy B Show”, a popular program devoted to health and wellness subjects. On the show Dr Sarphie discussed his background and described the benefits of Oxford MediStress’s CopingCapacity™ test. The proprietary blood test provides a highly sensitive indication of stress levels, offering the first direct way to monitor and quantify how an individual is coping with their stress. A tiny drop of blood from a finger-prick is mixed with chemicals which mimic a bacterial challenge. The ability of the leukocytes (white blood cells) to respond to such an in vitro challenge is evaluated using a standard laboratory procedure. Results and interpretation are available within minutes, so that action can be taken, if required.

Commenting on the test kit, Dr Sarphie said: “We were thrilled to be invited onto the show to discuss our unique product and how it can be used to help individuals suffering from stress.” The video link can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4tqzf1L–g

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International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics

December 20, 2013

This study demonstrates how immune responsiveness, known to be influenced by psychological stress, can be used to assess changes in mental workload...

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This study demonstrates how immune responsiveness, known to be influenced by psychological stress, can be used to assess changes in mental workload. Healthy male and female subjects provided capillary blood samples before and after completing the same, basic, driver-related tasks followed by a simple manoeuvre in two unfamiliar motor vehicles.

Using the Leukocyte Coping Capacity (LCC) test kit, the ability of leukocytes to produce reactive oxygen species in vitro was assessed. Significant post-stressor changes in leukocyte activity were demonstrated between treatment groups. These findings add weight to the proposition that leukocyte activation is a useful quantitative measure of psychological stress and mental loading in humans. This study demonstrates the diagnostic ability of LCC for use during ergonomic evaluation.

SHELTON-RAYNER G, MIAN R, CHANDLER S, ROBERTSON D, MACDONALD DW (2012) Leukocyte responsiveness, a quantitative assay for subjective mental workload. Int J Industrial Ergonomics 42, 25-33.

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International Journal of Human Computer Interaction

December 20, 2013

The capability of drivers to accomplish basic tasks utilizing differing sensory modalities while maintaining lane discipline within a computer-simulated environment was assessed...

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The capability of drivers to accomplish basic tasks utilizing differing sensory modalities while maintaining lane discipline within a computer-simulated environment was assessed. Subjects provided capillary blood samples before and after using three human–machine interface designs—touch-screen, voice control, and multimodal.

Using the Leukocyte Coping Capacity test kit, the ability of leukocytes to produce reactive oxygen species in vitro was assessed. Significant post-stressor changes in leukocyte activity of varying magnitude were observed following the use of all interfaces; with the multimodal interface provoking the most pronounced response and voice control the least. Results support the proposition for using immune responsiveness as a means for quantifying psychological stress.

SHELTON-RAYNER G, MIAN R, CHANDLER S, ROBERTSON D, MACDONALD DW (2011) Quantitative physiological assessment of mental loading via altered immune functioning following interaction with differing automotive interface technologies. International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction 27 (9), 900–919.

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Experimental Physiology Journal

December 20, 2013

In this experiment badgers (Meles meles), which were caught as part of an on-going population study, were either transported to a central site prior to blood sampling or blood was collected at their site of captur...

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In this experiment badgers (Meles meles), which were caught as part of an on-going population study, were either transported to a central site prior to blood sampling or blood was collected at their site of capture. Using the leukocyte coping capacity (LCC) test kit, the ability of leukocytes to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro was assessed.

Transported animals had a significantly lower leukocyte coping capacity score (LCC) and showed changes in leukocyte composition that were indicative of stress. The study concluded that the stress of transport reduced LCC in badgers and that LCC serves as a quantitative measure of stress. Potential applications of this method are discussed.

MCLAREN, G., MACDONALD, D.W., GEORGIOU, C., NEWMAN, C. and MIAN, R. (2003) Leukocyte coping capacity: a novel technique for measuring the stress response in vertebrates Experimental Physiology 88 (4) pp. 541-546 (ISSN: 0958 0607).

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